Travel activities and motivations survey — Canadian travel market

Participating in Extreme Air Sports While on Trips of One or More Nights

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A Profile Report — October 28, 2007
Executive summary

Over the last two years, only 0.8% (207,529) of adult Canadians participated in an extreme air sport while on an out-of-town, overnight trip of one or more nights. Parachuting (0.4%) was undertaken more often than hot air ballooning (0.3%) and hang gliding (0.2%). Participation in an extreme sport was the least common of the 21 outdoor activity types undertaken by Canadian Pleasure Travelers while traveling in the past two years. Of those who participated in an extreme air sport, 31.7% (65,745) reported that this activity was the main reason for taking at least one trip.

Those who participated in extreme air sports while on trips are more likely to be young (18 to 34 years of age) and male. They are over-represented among Young Singles and Young Couples. While their education level is somewhat above-average (37.5% are university graduates) they have the lowest average household incomes ($68,946) of the 21 outdoor activity types.

Those who participated in an extreme air sport are relatively frequent travelers. They were the 7th most likely of the 21 outdoor activity types to have taken a trip within their own province or region (93.7%), the 4th most likely to have traveled to an adjacent province or region (61.7%) and the most likely to have visited a non-adjacent province or region (45.2%). They were especially over-represented among travelers to Nunavut, British Columbia, Alberta and Manitoba. Those who participated in an extreme air sport were also frequent out-of-country travelers. They were the most likely of the 21 outdoor activity types to have taken an overseas trip (52.7%) and the 3rd most likely to have visited Mexico (21.8%).

Those who participated in an extreme air sport while on trips were exceptionally active in both outdoor activities and culture and entertainment pursuits. They were much more active than the average Canadian Pleasure Traveler in all outdoor activities and especially physically challenging activities (e.g., hiking, climbing and paddling; downhill skiing and snowboarding, cycling). They were also much more likely than average to participate in cultural activities (e.g., historical sites, museums and art galleries) and entertainment activities (e.g., tastings; musical concerts, festivals and attraction. These high-energy travelers seek novelty, lots to see and do and unique experiences (e.g., submarine cruises, vacation on houseboats, air tours) while on vacation.

Extreme air sport participants are above-average users of the Internet to plan (74.6%) and book (48.9%) travel. They are among the most avid consumers of travel-related media and can also be targeted effectively through magazines on outdoor activities and sports and science and geography, and modern or alternative rock radio stations.